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  • Univerity of Ghana
  •  University of Ghana

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    The University of Ghana is the oldest and largest of the thirteen Ghanaian national public universities. [3] It was founded in 1948, [4] in the British colony of the Gold Coast , as the University College of the Gold Coast , [5][6] and was originally an affiliate college of the

    University of London , [7] which supervised its academic programs and awarded degrees. [8] After independence in 1957, the college was renamed the University College of Ghana .[9] It changed its name again to the University of Ghana in 1961, when it gained full university status. [10] The University of Ghana is situated on the West view of the Accra Legon hills and at the northeast of the centre of Accra, now has various schools, institutions, colleges and departments and has over 40,000 registered students. [7]

    Introduction

    The original emphasis on establishing the University of Ghana was on the liberal arts, social sciences, law, basic science, agriculture and medicine[11] . However, as part of a national educational reform program, the university's curriculum was expanded to provide more technology-based and vocational courses as well as

    postgraduate training.[ citation needed] .

    The University of Ghana which is mainly based at Legon , about 12 kilometres northeast of the center of Accra has its medical school in the town called

    Korle-Bu , with a teaching hospital and a secondary/external campus in the city of Accra. [ citation needed] It also has a graduate school of nuclear and Allied Sciences at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission , [1] making it one of the few universities on the African continent offering programs in nuclear physics and nuclear engineering [12] .

    Vision

    The vision of the University of Ghana has always been to develop world-class human resources with capabilities to meet the nation's development needs and global challenges through quality teaching, learning, research and knowledge sharing [13] and "to become a world class research-intensive university over the next decade"[14] .

    Mission

    The University of Ghana has in its mission, to create an enabling environment that makes the university increasingly become relevant to national and global development through cutting-edge research, as well as high quality teaching and learning [15] .

    Values

    The four values of the University of Ghana education are Integrity ,

    Commitment , Respect and Loyalty [16] .

    Strategic priorities

    The University of Ghana strategic values include the following [17] ;

    a. Relevant cutting edge research and community engagement

    b. Highest international standard of teaching, learning and development of leadership

    c. Fulfilling experiences for internal stakeholders

    d. Equal opportunity in gender and adversity

    e. Achieving greater effectiveness and efficiency of institutional processes

    f. Financial performance to enhance the mobilization and management of resources at unit and central administration levels

    g. Strengthen the management of the University's assets and facilities

    h. System-wide monitoring and evaluation

    i. Build external stakeholder confidence in the capabilities of the university

    The University of Ghana Logo

    University of Ghana Logo[18]

    The Logo is made up of three colors; the midnight blue, lemon yellow and vegas gold [19] . The Blue shield with three ''AYA'' standing upright in top half and ''DWENINMENTOAS'' in the middle of bottom half, all embossed in gold [16] . The Logo was designed by A. M. Opoku [20] . ''AYA''(Akan word for fern) is an Adinkra Symbol .[2] The ''AYA'' grows straight and it is used here to represent truthfulness and an ability to stay upright.

    Ram's Horns:'Dweninmen' (Akan word for Ram's Horn) is an Adinkra symbol [21] . Here, two interlocking ram's horns (DWENINMENTOASO) have been used to symbolise strength and a call to pursue a path of integrity [21] .

    History

    The formation of the West African Commission of the Asquith Commission on Higher Education in the Colonies [22] under the chairmanship of

    Rt. Hon. Walter Elliot was the birth of this notable institution in 1948. [23] The commission recommended the setting up of university colleges in association with the University of London , thus the University College of the Gold Coast was founded by Ordinance on 11 August 1948 for the purpose of providing for and promoting university education, learning and research. [24] This was made possible by the rejection of the first recommendation which stated that only one university college was feasible for the whole of British West Africa, which would be located in Nigeria by the people of Gold Coast led principally by Dr. J. B. Danquah . [22]

    The University College of Gold Coast as the time became the University College of Ghana after the country attained its independence from the British colony. In October 1961 the University College of Ghana attained sovereign university status and was assigned the mandate by an acto of Parliament to award its own degrees[25] .

    Office of the Chancellor

    Mrs. Mary Chinery-Hesse

    Mrs. Mary Chinery-Hesse is the current Chancellor of the University. [26] She was duly elected as Chancellor and subsequently inducted into office on Wednesday, August 1, 2018 at a Special Congregation of the University held in the Great Hall. [27]

    Past Chancellors of the University

    Until the year 1998, the Head of State acted as Chancellor of the University of Ghana. [28] Thus, from 1961 when the University of Ghana was established by an Act of Parliament, the first Head of State of independent Ghana, Dr. Kwame Nkrumah became the first Chancellor of the University of Ghana. [29]

    The following have held the position of Chancellor of the University:

    Dr. Kwame Nkrumah (1961-1965) [28]

    General Joseph Arthur Ankrah (1966-1968) [28]

    General Akwasi Amankwa Afrifa (1969 - )[28]

    Justice Edward Akufo-Addo (1970-1971) [28]

    General Ignatius Kutu Acheampong (1972-1978) [28]

    Fred Akuffo (1978-1979) [28]

    Dr. Hilla Limann (1979-1981) [28]

    Flt. Lt. Jerry John Rawlings (1982-1991) [28]

    Oyeeman Wereko Ampem II (1998-2005) [28]

    Kofi Annan (2008-2018) [28]

    Office of the Vice-Chancellor

    Prof. Ebenezer Oduro Owusu

    Professor Ebenezer Oduro Owusu is the current Vice-Chancellor of the University of Ghana. [30]

    Past Vice-Chancellors & Principals

    UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE GOLD COAST

    David Mowbray Balme (1948-1957), Principal [31]

    UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF GHANA

    David Mowbray Balme (1957-1958), Principal [32]

    Raymond Henry Stoughton (1958-1961), Principal

    Conor Cruise O'Brien (1962-1965), Vice-Chancellor [33]

    Alexander Kwapong (1966-1975), Vice-Chancellor [34]

    Daniel Adzei Bekoe (1976-1983), Vice-Chancellor [35]

    Akilagpa Sawyerr (1985-1992), Vice-Chancellor[36]

    George Benneh (1992-1996), Vice-Chancellor[37]

    Ivan Addae-Mensah (1996-2002), Vice-Chancellor [38]

    Kwadwo Asenso-Okyere (2002-2006), Vice-Chancellor [39]

    Clifford Nii-Boi Tagoe (2006-2010), Vice-Chancellor [40]

    Ernest Aryeetey (2010-2016), Vice-Chancellor[41]

    Academics

    The Balme Library

    Main entrance to the Balme Library

    Main article: The Balme Library

    The Balme Library was established in 1948 as the Achimota College Library. [42] It is the main and mother library of the university's library network. [43] The Balme library is located on the main campus of the University. The central location of the Library, its facilities and the scope of the coverage of the collection makes it a very important and vital part of academic life on campus. [43]

    The Library provides excellent facilities, products and services. Products include reference materials, text books, journal databases and study carrels. Facilities include the 24-Hour Reading Room, the Research Commons (RC) ,

    the Knowledge Commons (KC) , the Information Access Center (IAC) printing and binding services, photocopy services and a networked environment with computers.[43]

    College of Health Sciences

    There are six Schools and one Research Institute under this college. [44][45] They include:

    School of Medicine and Dentistry

    School of Biomedical and Allied Health Sciences

    School of Nursing Located on the

    Legon campus though its students receive practical training at the

    Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital.

    School of Pharmacy

    School of Public Health

    School of Education and Leadership

    Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research

    Centre for Tropical, Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics

    Collegiate system

    Starting from the 2014/2015 academic year, the University of Ghana adopted the collegiate system [46] and thus categorized all schools and departments under four colleges, which are:

    College of Basic and Applied Sciences

    College of Humanities

    College of Education

    College of Health Sciences

    Other faculties

    There are five faculties outside the above Colleges and they include:

    Faculty of Arts

    Faculty of Social Studies

    Department of Economics of University of Ghana

    Faculty of Science

    Faculty of Law; the Faculty of Law was first established as a department of the Faculty of Social Studies in the 1958/59 academic year and became a full-fledged faculty in the 1960/61 academic year. [47] From the 2012/2013 academic year, the university will admit fresh Senior High School (S.H.S) students into the LLB first-degree program, but will retain the post-first degree program. Thus the university will have two entry means to the Faculty of Law [48] .

    Faculty of Engineering Sciences

    University of Ghana Campuses

    Legon Campus

    The Legon Campus lies about 13 kilometers north-east of Accra, the capital of Ghana. This is where most of the University's teaching and research are carried out. The Legon Campus also houses the central administration of the University. there are a number of student residences located on the Legon Campus.[21]

    Korle-Bu Campus

    The Korle-Bu Campus, headed by a Provost, houses the administration of the College of Health Sciences. Some of the constituent schools are also located on the Korle-Bu Campus; the School of Medicine and Dentistry and the School of Allied Health Sciences.

    Accra City Campus

    This campus is strategically located in the heart of the city.

    Distance Education Campuses

    The university has Distance Education campuses in the various regions where it runs a variety of programs, including degree courses. [49] Awudome College has residential facilities that enable running of short courses, over weekends and other durations.

    Accra Workers' College, (now Accra City campus), Accra

    Awudome Residential Workers' College, Tsito

    Bolgatanga Workers' College,

    Bolgatanga

    Cape Coast Workers' College, Cape Coast

    Ho Workers' College, Ho

    Koforidua Workers' College,

    Koforidua

    Kumasi Workers' College, Kumasi

    Takoradi Workers' College, Sekondi-Takoradi

    Tamale Workers' College, Tamale

    Tema Workers' College, Tema

    Sunyani Workers' College, Sunyani

    Wa Workers' College, Wa

    Associations and Links

    International Association of Universities (IAU)

    Association of Commonwealth Universities (ACU)

    Association of African Universities (AAU)

    World Universities Network (WUN)

    Norwegian Universities' Committee for Development Research and Education

    Council for International Educational Exchange (CIEE)

    International Student Exchange Programmes (ISEP)

    Universities Students Exchange Consortium (USAC)[21]

    Institutional Affiliations[50]

    Accra College of Medicine, Accra

    African University College of Business & Technology, Accra

    Catholic University College, Sunyani

    Christian Service University College, Kumasi

    Family Health Medical School, Accra

    Ghana Armed Forces Command and Staff College, Accra

    Ghana Institute of Languages , Accra

    Institute of Accountancy Training, Accra

    Islamic University College, Accra

    Knustford University College, Accra

    Methodist University College, Accra

    Narh-Bita College, Tema

    Nightingale School of Nursing, Accra

    National Film and Television Institute (NAFTI), Accra

    Presbyterian University College, Mpraeso/ Abetifi-Kwahu

    Regional Maritime University , Accra

    St. Peter's Seminary, Cape-Coast

    St. Paul's Seminary, Sowutuom-Achimota

    St. Victor's Seminary, Tamale

    Western Hills School of Nursing, Accra

    Wisconsin International University College, Accra [51]

    Reputation

    The Times Higher Education World University Rankings of 2018 ranks the University of Ghana at the 800-1000th place globally and 17th in Africa (rank shared with other universities) [55] .

    Research and learning centres

    School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences

    Center of Excellence for Global Environmental Change Research.

    Center for Social Policy Analysis

    Center for Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System

    Legon Center for International Affairs and Diplomacy

    Center for Migration

    International Center for African Music and Dance

    Center for Tropical Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics

    Center for Biotechnology Research

    Center for African Wetlands

    Language Center

    West African Center for Crop Improvement

    West African Center for Cell Biology and Infectious Pathogens

    The United Nations University for Natural Resources in Africa

    Center for Gender Studies and Advocacy(CEGENSA)

    Regional Training Center for Archivists

    Ecological laboratory

    Legon Botanical Gardens

    The Ghana Herbarium

    Center for African Foods

    Center for West African foods

    Center for International foods

    Center for Ghana foods

    African Regional Center for training in postgraduate insect science

    Institute of African Studies

    Institute of Statistical, Social and Economic Research (ISSER)

    Regional Institute of Population Studies(RIPS)

    Institute for Environment and Sanitation Studies (IESS)

    Key Research Areas of the University of Ghana

    Malaria Research

    Trans-disciplinary Research into Climate Change Adaption

    Enhancing Food Production and Processing

    Development Policy and Poverty Monitoring and Evaluation[21]

    Kade Agricultural Research Station

    Kade Agricultural Research Centre

    Kade Agricultural Research Station , or

    Kade Agricultural Research Centre, is an agricultural research center located at Kade , in the Eastern Region of Ghana is part of the University of Ghana Centers of Research and Learning. [56] It is one of the three agricultural research centers of Ghana's university. The center at Kade was established in 1957. It covers an area of 99.3 hectares and is mainly concerned with research into production of forest zone crops such as citrus , plantain , cocoyam, oil palm and rubber, with a special interest in agronomy of perennial crop plants.

    Delonix regia at UGASS

    Making of Rubber

    Rubbers hanged to dry

    Kade Agricultural Research Center Entrance

    Facilities

    Halls of residence [57]

    The halls of residence of the University of Ghana has been described as "home away from home." Halls of residence are provided for graduate and undergraduate students. There are also flats and guest rooms for senior members and guests. There are main halls of residence by the Government of Ghana and private halls of residence built on campus by individuals and corporate bodies[58][59] . Below are descriptions of the halls of residence; Commonwealth Hall, Legon Hall, Mensah Sarbah Hall, Volta Hall, Akuafo Hall and Jubilee Hall at the University of Ghana, Legon.

    Commonwealth Hall (the university's only male hall of residence). Known as the Vandals Hall, the word VANDALS is an acronym for Vivacious, Affable, Neighborly, Devoted, Altruistic and Loyal. For the name vandals, the students of the Commonwealth Hall recognized themselves with the common name known as 'V' Mates with a response word 'Sharp'. The males of this hall believe in and uphold customs and traditions. The VANDALS are said to represent the voices of the entire student body, making known students' cases and issues, for appropriate solutions from authorities. Often clad in red, as the colour of their identity, ladies who wore red attire to their environment had always been cheered for identifying with them. The VANDALs pride themselves with leadership qualities and unity, making the old VANDALS always proud. [60]

    Legon Hall (The Legon Hall is the premier hall of the University of Ghana). Legon Hall was the first hall of residence to be considered and built on the University of Ghana campus, thus referred to as the Premier Hall. The Hall is located at the Centre of the school close to the biggest library (the Balme Library) in the West African region. Just like the Mensah Sarbah Hall and the Akuafo Hall, Legon Hall serves as home for both male and female students, allowing for strong bonds between the sexes on the campus. Legon Hall has produced a number of prominent personalities [61] . The motto of the Legon hall is; "Cui Multidum Datum", which means "human relations with examples "[62] .

    Mensah Sarbah Hall (The Mensah Sarbah Hall is the first hall to be named after a hero of the nation; Dr. Mensah Sarbah). The hall is recognised to host most of the best athletes on the university campus, influencing laurels.

    Volta Hall (the university's female-only hall of residence). It is the only all-female hall on campus known for their discipline and neatness. The hall has churned out many respectable women such as the first female Chief Justice Georgina Theodora Woode .

    Akuafo Hall The word "akuafo" is an Akan word which means farmers. For this reason the hall is notably called the Farmers hall with a rich Ghanaian culture and tradition. The Akuafo Hall was the second hall of residence to be established in the University of Ghana. Their chieftaincy institution serves as a symbol of unity for students and also helps to promote and showcase the rich Ghanaian culture. The chief farmer and his queen mother are elected annually[citation needed].

    Jubilee Hall. The Jubilee Hall is one of the halls of residence of the University of Ghana, Legon. The Jubilee hall is located on the south of the university campus, and opposite to the International Students Hostel. Jubilee Hall was built to commemorate the Universitys’ Golden Jubilee celebration in 1998. The hall was mainly built through support funds from alumni of the university [63] .

    The university has eight newly created halls of residence that were commissioned in 2011. They are:

    Alexander Kwapong Hall , named after Professor Alexander Kwapong a former Vice-Chancellor and Chairman of the Council of State. [64]

    Jean Nelson Akah Hall , named after an alumnus, Jean Nelson Akah . It was inaugurated in July 2010. Its emblem shows a candle, a book and a pen to symbolize perseverance. It was designed by a final year Physics-Computer Science major student Raymond Sung-Seh Harrison. The motto of the hall, "Lux in Tenebris ", which is Latin for "Light in Darkness", was suggested by Raymond's mate at the time, a lady by the name Muna Twerefour. The emblem was officially adopted on Tuesday, 2 April 2013.

    Hilla Limann Hall , the first of the University of Ghana Enterprise Limited (UGEL) hostels to be completed. It was inaugurated in July 2010, [65] during which the Vice-Chancellor announced the decision to name it after Dr. Hilla Limann , a former President of the Republic of Ghana. Senior members of the University may be assigned as Fellows of the Hall by the Vice Chancellor. Students assigned/affiliated to the Hall form the Junior members. The Head of the Hall, Senior Tutor and fellow tutors serve as a body which helps with the governing of the Hall.

    Elizabeth Sey Hall , the second of the newer halls built by University of Ghana Enterprise Limited (UGEL) Hostels to be completed. It was inaugurated in July 2010 and was named after the first female graduate of the university, Elizabeth Frances Baaba Sey .

    Africa Union Hall , formerly called Pentagon, built by Social Security and National Insurance Trust (SSNIT) .

    James Topp Nelson Yankah Hall , formerly known as Teachers Fund (TF) Hostel. [66]

    Bani Hall , initially a private hostel and later had transferred to the status of a hall after the tenancy agreement with the University had elapsed.

    Evandy Hall , formerly Evandy Hostel and this was turned into a hall after the tenancy agreement with the University elapsed and ownership transferred to University authorities,

    Entrance to Mensah Sarbah Hall, University of Ghana

    Hostels

    There are ten university hostels: the International Students Hostels (I and II), the Valco Trust Hostel, the Commonwealth Hall, the Akuafo Hall, the Mensah Sarbah Hall, the Legon Hall, the Limann Hall, the Kwapong Hall, the Elizabeth Sey Hall and the Jean Akah Nelson hall. There are also private hostels, SSNIT Hostels (Ghana Hostels also known as Pentagon). [67]

    Bank, postal and other services

    Ghana Commercial Bank , Standard Chartered Bank, Barclays Bank, Cal Bank, HFC Bank , Access Bank, Stanbic Bank, Ecobank Ghana and Prudential Bank have branches on the Legon campus. There is a branch of the national postal service (Ghana Post) on campus. Other banks have ATMs on campus.

    Roads usage and user charges

    From 1 February 2014, all vehicles entering the University of Ghana's main campus, and also those using the road passing through the Staff Village of the University were required to pay charges. This was heavily criticized by public and students and was therefore suspended [68] . Currently, various entry points into the campus require vehicle owners (typically staff and students) to obtain electronically scannable cards issued and authorized by the transport unit of the university.

    Notable alumni

    George Kingsley Acquah – Chief Justice of Ghana (2003–2007)

    Edward Doe Adjaho – Speaker of Parliament of Ghana (2013–2017)

    Sophia Ophilia Adjeibea Adinyira – justice of the Supreme Court of Ghana (2006–2019)

    Peter Ala Adjetey – former speaker of the Parliament of Ghana (2001–05)

    Kwadwo Afari-Gyan – Chairman of the Electoral Commission of Ghana (1992–15)

    Ama Ataa Aidoo – playwright

    Vida Akoto-Bamfo – Justice of the

    Supreme Court of Ghana (2009 – 2019)

    Sophia Akuffo , 13th Chief Justice of Ghana

    Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo –

    President of Ghana (2017–present)

    Akwasi Afrifa (Ghanaian MP) – former member of parliament

    Mabel Agyemang née Banful (also Yamoa) - Appeal Court judge for the

    Commonwealth Secretariat , served in the judiciaries of the governments of Ghana, The Gambia and Swaziland

    Nene Amegatcher – active Justice of the Supreme Court of Ghana (2018–)

    Paa Kwesi Amissah-Arthur – Vice President of the Republic of Ghana 2012–17

    Patrick Amoah-Ntim – Retired Ghanaian diplomat

    K. Y. Amoako – former UN Under-Secretary-General and Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission for Africa

    Yaw Appau – active Justice of the

    Supreme Court of Ghana (2015–)

    Anas Aremeyaw Anas – investigative journalist with Insight TWI: The World Investigates, CEO of Tiger Eye Private Investigations, Executive Director of The Crusading Guide

    Kwasi Anin-Yeboah – Current Chief Justice of Ghana (2019–)

    Joyce Rosalind Aryee - Minister of Education (1985–1987), Member of the National Defence Council (1993-2001), received Second Highest State Award, the Companion of the Order of the Volta in 2006

    Benjamin Teiko Aryeetey – Justice of the Supreme Court of Ghana (2009–2011)

    Kofi Awoonor – Ghanaian poet and author whose work combined the poetic traditions of his native Ewe people and contemporary and religious symbolism to depict Africa during decolonization

    George Ayittey – economist, author, and president of the Free Africa Foundation, professor at American University, associate scholar at the

    Foreign Policy Research Institute.

    Elizabeth-Irene Baitie – award-winning writer of young adult fiction

    Josiah Ofori Boateng , Justice of the

    Supreme Court of Ghana (1999–2001); Electoral Commissioner of Ghana (1989–1992)

    Kwesi Botchwey – former law lecturer and finance minister of Ghana (1982–95).

    Mohamed Ibn Chambas – Executive Secretary of the Economic Community of West African States .

    Phyllis Christian – lawyer, CEO of ShawbellConsulting

    Alexander Adu Clerk – sleep medicine specialist and psychiatrist

    George C. Clerk – pioneer botanist and plant pathologist

    Nicholas T. Clerk – academic, public administrator and Presbyterian minister; former Rector, GIMPA

    Kwesi Dickson – former President of

    Methodist Church Ghana

    Agnes Dordzie – active justice of the

    Supreme Court of Ghana (2018–)

    Jones Victor Mawulorm Dotse – active justice of the Supreme Court of Ghana (2008–) and the Supreme Court of the Gambia (2008–)

    Kwabena Dufuor –former Finance Minister and former Governor of the

    Bank of Ghana .

    Komla Dumor – television news presenter for the BBC World , presenting BBC World News and Africa Business Report. 2003 winner of Journalist of the Year award given by the Ghana Journalist Association.

    Nana Effah-Apenteng – the Permanent Representative of Ghana to the United Nations between May 2000 and 2007.

    Ben Ephson - publisher and Managing Editor of the Daily Dispatch

    Akin Euba - Nigerian composer, musicologist and pianist, Andrew Mellon Professor of Music at the

    University of Pittsburgh .

    Kwabena Frimpong-Boateng –

    cardiothoracic surgeon and former Chief Executive officer of the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, first black African to perform heart transplant and established the National Cardiothoracic Centre, Minister for Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation (2017–present)

    Nasiru Sulemana Gbadegbe – active Justice of the Supreme Court of Ghana (2009–)

    Ken Kanda – diplomat, the Permanent Representative of Ghana to the United Nations.

    Nii Ashie Kotey – An academic and active justice of the Supreme Court of Ghana (2018–)

    Akua Kuenyehia – Vice-President,

    International Criminal Court (2003–Date)

    John Dramani Mahama – Vice-President of Ghana (2009–12) and

    President of Ghana (2012–17)

    Samuel Marful-Sau – active Justice of the Supreme Court of Ghana (2018–)

    Vicki Miles-LaGrange (born 1953) – Chief U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Oklahoma , first African-American woman to be U.S. attorney for the Western District of Oklahoma, and the first African-American female elected to the Oklahoma Senate

    John Evans Atta Mills – former Law professor and Vice-President of Ghana (1997–2001), President of Ghana (2009–12)

    Tawiah Modibo Ocran – Judge of the Supreme Court of Ghana (2004–2008)

    George Tawia Odamtten – Mycologist

    David Ofori-Adjei – elected to the Council of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology of the International Union of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology in 2000

    Walter Samuel Nkanu Onnoghen - Chief Justice of Nigeria (2017–present)

    Aaron Mike Oquaye – former Minister of Communication (2005–09) and Member of Parliament for

    Dome-Kwabenya (2005 to present), Speaker of Parliament (2017–present)

    Rose Constance Owusu – Justice of the Supreme Court of Ghana (2008 – 2014)

    Gabriel Pwamang – active Justice of the Supreme Court of Ghana (2015–)

    Nana Akuoko Sarpong - Omanhene of Agogo

    Ebenezer Sekyi-Hughes - Speaker of

    Parliament of Ghana (7 January 2005 – 6 January 2009).

    Elizabeth Frances Sey (1927–1991) first female graduate of the University College of the Gold Coast and pioneering woman educator. A residence hall on the campus is named in her honour.[69]

    Gertrude Torkornoo – active Justice of the Supreme Court of Ghana (2019–)

    Tsatsu Tsikata – former Chief Executive of the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation and Law lecturer at the University of Ghana.

    Nana Anima Wiafe-Akenten – linguist, the author of the first doctoral dissertation in the Twi language

    Georgina Theodora Wood – first female Chief Justice of Ghana (since 2007). [70]

    In popular culture

    The university has appeared in several films and television advertisements. The television series Sun City has a lot of scenes of the university. The name of the university has also been referenced in the lyrics of artists in Ghana, including Sarkodie's "Legon Girls", Buk Bak's "Klu blɔfo ", Kwadei's "Wutatami " and Okordii's "Four years in Legon". [71] In June 2020 the University of Ghana was resolute to continue with its planned online teaching and learning for the second semester of the 2019/2020 academic year despite the government's plan to reopen schools for final year students. [72]

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