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  •  Thought Leadership Meets Business

    How business schools can become more successful

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    Chapter

    Preface

    Peter Lorange

    How business schools can become more successful

    Published online: 22 September 2009

    Chapter

    Rethinking management education and its models: a critical examination of management and management education

    Howard Thomas , Peter Lorange ,

    Jagdish Sheth

    Emergent Challenges and New Business Models

    Published online: 05 July 2013

    Chapter

    Institutional learning

    Peter Lorange

    How business schools can become more successful

    Published online: 22 September 2009

    Chapter

    Business school leadership issues

    Peter Lorange

    How business schools can become more successful

    Published online: 22 September 2009

    Chapter

    Marketing strategy

    Peter Lorange

    How business schools can become more successful

    Published online: 22 September 2009

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    Conclusion: So, what are the key success factors?

    Peter Lorange

    How business schools can become more successful

    Published online: 22 September 2009

    Chapter

    The learning partner perspective

    Peter Lorange

    How business schools can become more successful

    Published online: 22 September 2009

    Chapter

    The critical role of R&D

    Peter Lorange

    How business schools can become more successful

    Published online: 22 September 2009

    Chapter

    Human resources strategy

    Peter Lorange



    Published online: 22 September 2009

    Chapter

    Business school identity and legitimacy: its relationship to the modern university and society

    Howard Thomas , Peter Lorange ,

    Jagdish Sheth

    Emergent Challenges and New Business Models

    Published online: 05 July 2013

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    2008

    Online publication date: September 2009

    1 - Background and conceptual framework

    Peter Lorange , IMD, Lausanne, Switzerland

    Publisher: Cambridge University Press

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511488474.003

    pp 1-31

    Summary

    I think the biggest issue and opportunity is globalization. As business becomes more global, and our students and faculty more international, we need to build on the efforts we've launched and seek new ways to prepare students to lead in a globalized world.

    Jay Light, dean, Harvard Business School

    KEY POINTS

    The growth and complexity of businesses today is spurring strong growth and fierce competition in the executive education segment.

    Companies and executives want development opportunities that are grounded in real life.

    In order to maximize academic value, business schools must adopt an interactive, two-way learning approach where propositional knowledge meets prescriptive knowledge.

    This interactive, two-way learning partnership benefits all involved – practitioners and professors alike.

    INTRODUCTION

    The challenge for business schools is to create value for their learning partners by establishing the critical link between real-life issues and research-based management insights. While this viewpoint may be quite commonplace nowadays, it is still rare to find schools that do it well. Too often, even those schools with the best intentions have failed to translate their ambitions into action. They frequently treat the teaching of executives as a one-way process, talking “to them” rather than “with them.” They have not grasped how to deliver their research findings in more meaningful and interesting ways so that practicing managers can internalize them and apply them to their real-world situations.

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