WELCOME TO GODSTARTER

  • . Project Gutenberg EBook of Pushing to the Front, by Orison Swett Marden
  •  


    This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.  You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

    Title: Pushing to the Front

    Author: Orison Swett Marden

    Release Date: May 4, 2007 [EBook #21291]

    Language: English

    *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK PUSHING TO THE FRONT ***

    Produced by Al Haines

    [Frontispiece: Orison Swett Marden]

    Pushing to the Front

    BY

    ORISON SWETT MARDEN

    "The world makes way for the determined man."

    PUBLISHED BY

    The Success Company's

    Branch Offices

    PETERSBURG, N.Y. ---- TOLEDO ---- DANVILLE

    OKLAHOMA CITY ---- SAN JOSE

    COPYRIGHT, 1911,

    By ORISON SWETT MARDEN.

    FOREWORD

    This revised and greatly enlarged edition of "Pushing to the Front" is the outgrowth of an almost world-wide demand for an extension of the idea which made the original small volume such an ambition-arousing, energizing, inspiring force.

    It is doubtful whether any other book, outside of the Bible, has been the turning-point in more lives.

    It has sent thousands of youths, with renewed determination, back to school or college, back to all sorts of vocations which they had abandoned in moments of discouragement.  It has kept scores of business men from failure after they had given up all hope.

    It has helped multitudes of poor boys and girls to pay their way through college who had never thought a liberal education possible.

    The author has received thousands of letters from people in nearly all parts of the world telling how the book has aroused their ambition, changed their ideals and aims, and has spurred them to the successful undertaking of what they before had thought impossible.

    The book has been translated into many foreign languages.  In Japan and several other countries it is used extensively in the public schools. Distinguished educators in many parts of the world have recommended its use in schools as a civilization-builder.

    Crowned heads, presidents of republics, distinguished members of the British and other parliaments, members of the United States Supreme Court, noted authors, scholars, and eminent people in many parts of the world, have eulogized this book and have thanked the author for giving it to the world.

    This volume is full of the most fascinating romances of achievement under difficulties, of obscure beginnings and triumphant endings, of stirring stories of struggles and triumphs.  It gives inspiring stories of men and women who have brought great things to pass.  It gives numerous examples of the triumph of mediocrity, showing how those of ordinary ability have succeeded by the use of ordinary means.  It shows how invalids and cripples even have triumphed by perseverance and will over seemingly insuperable difficulties.

    The book tells how men and women have seized common occasions and made them great; it tells of those of average ability who have succeeded by the use of ordinary means, by dint of indomitable will and inflexible purpose.  It tells how poverty and hardship have rocked the cradle of the giants of the race.  The book points out that most people do not utilize a large part of their effort because their mental attitude does not correspond with their endeavor, so that although working for one thing, they are really expecting something else; and it is what we expect that we tend to get.

    No man can become prosperous while he really expects or half expects to remain poor, for holding the poverty thought, keeping in touch with poverty-producing conditions, discourages prosperity.

    Before a man can lift himself he must lift his thoughts.  When we shall have learned to master our thought habits, to keep our minds open to the great divine inflow of life force, we shall have learned the truths of human endowment, human possibility.

    The book points out the fact that what is called success may be failure; that when men love money so much that they sacrifice their friendships, their families, their home life, sacrifice position, honor, health, everything for the dollar, their life is a failure, although they may have accumulated money.  It shows how men have become rich at the price of their ideals, their character, at the cost of everything noblest, best, and truest in life.  It preaches the larger doctrine of equality; the equality of will and purpose which paves a clear path even to the Presidential chair for a Lincoln or a Garfield, for any one who will pay the price of study and struggle.  Men who feel themselves badly handicapped, crippled by their lack of early education, will find in these pages great encouragement to broaden their horizon, and will get a practical, helpful, sensible education in their odd moments and half-holidays.

    Dr. Marden, in "Pushing to the Front," shows that the average of the leaders are not above the average of ability.  They are ordinary people, but of extraordinary persistence and perseverance.  It is a storehouse of noble incentive, a treasury of precious sayings.  There is inspiration and encouragement and helpfulness on every page.  It teaches the doctrine that no limits can be placed on one's career if he has once learned the alphabet and has push; that there are no barriers that can say to aspiring talent, "Thus far, and no farther." Encouragement is its keynote; it aims to arouse to honorable exertion those who are drifting without aim, to awaken dormant ambitions in those who have grown discouraged in the struggle for success.

    THE PUBLISHERS.

    CONTENTS

    CHAPTER

           I. THE MAN AND THE OPPORTUNITY       II. WANTED--A MAN      III. BOYS WITH NO CHANCE       IV. THE COUNTRY BOY        V. OPPORTUNITIES WHERE YOU ARE       VI. POSSIBILITIES IN SPARE MOMENTS      VII. HOW POOR BOYS AND GIRLS GO TO COLLEGE     VIII. YOUR OPPORTUNITY CONFRONTS YOU--WHAT WILL YOU DO WITH IT?       IX. ROUND BOYS IN SQUARE HOLES        X. WHAT CAREER?       XI. CHOOSING A VOCATION      XII. CONCENTRATED ENERGY     XIII. THE TRIUMPHS OF ENTHUSIASM      XIV. "ON TIME," OR, THE TRIUMPH OF PROMPTNESS       XV. WHAT A GOOD APPEARANCE WILL DO      XVI. PERSONALITY AS A SUCCESS ASSET     XVII. If YOU CAN TALK WELL    XVIII. A FORTUNE IN GOOD MANNERS      XIX. SELF-CONSCIOUSNESS AND TIMIDITY FOES TO SUCCESS       XX. TACT OR COMMON SENSE      XXI. ENAMORED OF ACCURACY     XXII. DO IT TO A FINISH    XXIII. THE REWARD OF PERSISTENCE     XXIV. NERVE--GRIP, PLUCK      XXV. CLEAR GRIT     XXVI. SUCCESS UNDER DIFFICULTIES    XXVII. USES OF OBSTACLES   XXVIII. DECISION     XXIX. OBSERVATION AS A SUCCESS FACTOR      XXX. SELF-HELP     XXXI. THE SELF-IMPROVEMENT HABIT    XXXII. RAISING OF VALUES   XXXIII. PUBLIC SPEAKING    XXXIV. THE TRIUMPHS OF THE COMMON VIRTUES     XXXV. GETTING AROUSED    XXXVI. THE MAN WITH AN IDEA   XXXVII. DARE  XXXVIII. THE WILL AND THE WAY    XXXIX. ONE UNWAVERING AIM       XL. WORK AND WAIT      XLI. THE MIGHT OF LITTLE THINGS     XLII. THE SALARY YOU DO NOT FIND IN YOUR PAY ENVELOPE    XLIII. EXPECT GREAT THINGS OF YOURSELF     XLIV. THE NEXT TIME YOU THINK YOU ARE A FAILURE      XLV. STAND FOR SOMETHING     XLVI. NATURE'S LITTLE BILL    XLVII. HABIT--THE SERVANT,--THE MASTER   XLVIII. THE CIGARETTE     XLIX. THE POWER OF PURITY        L. THE HABIT OF HAPPINESS       LI. PUT BEAUTY INTO YOUR LIFE      LII. EDUCATION BY ABSORPTION     LIII. THE POWER OF SUGGESTION      LIV. THE CURSE OF WORRY       LV. TAKE A PLEASANT THOUGHT TO BED WITH YOU      LVI. THE CONQUEST OF POVERTY     LVII. A NEW WAY OF BRINGING UP CHILDREN    LVIII. THE HOME AS A SCHOOL OF GOOD MANNERS      LIX. MOTHER       LX. WHY SO MANY MARRIED WOMEN DETERIORATE      LXI. THRIFT     LXII. A COLLEGE EDUCATION AT HOME    LXIII. DISCRIMINATION IN READING     LXIV. READING A SPUR TO AMBITION      LXV. WHY SOME SUCCEED AND OTHERS FAIL     LXVI. RICH WITHOUT MONEY

    ILLUSTRATIONS

    Orison Swett Marden . . . . . . . . . . _Frontispiece_

    House in which Abraham Lincoln was born

    Ulysses S. Grant

    William Ewart Gladstone

    John Wanamaker

    Jane Addams

    Thomas Alva Edison

    Henry Ward Beecher

    Lincoln studying by the firelight

    Marshall Field

    Joseph Jefferson [Transcriber's note: Jefferson was a prominent actor during the latter half of the 1800's.]

    Theodore Roosevelt

    Helen Keller

    William McKinley

    Julia Ward Howe

    Mark Twain

    PUSHING TO THE FRONT

    CHAPTER I

    THE MAN AND THE OPPORTUNITY

    No man is born into this world whose work is not born with him.--LOWELL.

    Things don't turn up in this world until somebody turns them up.--GARFIELD.

    Vigilance in watching opportunity; tact and daring in seizing upon opportunity; force and persistence in crowding opportunity to its utmost of possible achievement--these are the martial virtues which must command success.--AUSTIN PHELPS.

    "I will find a way or make one."

    There never was a day that did not bring its own opportunity for doing good that never could have been done before, and never can be again.--W. H. BURLEIGH.

      "Are you in earnest?  Seize this very minute;   What you can do, or dream you can, _begin_ it."

    "If we succeed, what will the world say?" asked Captain Berry in delight, when Nelson had explained his carefully formed plan before the battle of the Nile.

    "There is no if in the case," replied Nelson.  "That we shall succeed is certain.  Who may live to tell the tale is a very different question."  Then, as his captains rose from the council to go to their respective ships, he added: "Before this time to-morrow I shall have gained a peerage or Westminster Abbey."  His quick eye and daring spirit saw an opportunity of glorious victory where others saw only probable defeat.

    "Is it POSSIBLE to cross the path?" asked Napoleon of the engineers who had been sent to explore the dreaded pass of St. Bernard.  "Perhaps," was the hesitating reply, "it is within the limits of _possibility_."

    "FORWARD THEN," said the Little Corporal, without heeding their account of apparently insurmountable difficulties.  England and Austria laughed in scorn at the idea of transporting across the Alps, where "no wheel had ever rolled, or by any possibility could roll," an army of sixty thousand men, with ponderous artillery, tons of cannon balls and baggage, and all the bulky munitions of war.  But the besieged Massena was starving in Genoa, and the victorious Austrians thundered at the gates of Nice, and Napoleon was not the man to fail his former comrades in their hour of peril.

    When this "impossible" deed was accomplished, some saw that it might have been done long before.  Others excused themselves from encountering such gigantic obstacles by calling them insuperable.  Many a commander had possessed the necessary supplies, tools, and rugged soldiers, but lacked the grit and resolution of Bonaparte, who did not shrink from mere difficulties, however great, but out of his very need made and mastered his opportunity.

    Grant at New Orleans had just been seriously injured by a fall from his horse, when he received orders to take command at Chattanooga, so sorely beset by the Confederates that its surrender seemed only a question of a few days; for the hills around were all aglow by night with the camp-fires of the enemy, and supplies had been cut off. Though in great pain, he immediately gave directions for his removal to the new scene of action.

    On transports up the Mississippi, the Ohio, and one of its tributaries; on a litter borne by horses for many miles through the wilderness; and into the city at last on the shoulders of four men, he was taken to Chattanooga.  Things assumed a different aspect immediately.  _A master_ had arrived who was _equal to the situation_.  The army felt the grip of his power.  Before he could mount his horse he ordered an advance, and although the enemy contested the ground inch by inch, the surrounding hills were soon held by Union soldiers.

    Were these things the result of chance, or were they compelled by the indominable determination of the injured General?

    Did things _adjust themselves_ when Horatius with two companions held ninety thousand Tuscans at bay until the bridge across the Tiber had been destroyed?--when Leonidas at Thermopylae checked the mighty march of Xerxes?--when Themistocles, off the coast of Greece, shattered the Persian's Armada?--when Caesar, finding his army hard pressed, seized spear and buckler, fought while he reorganized his men, and snatched victory from defeat?--when Winkelried gathered to his heart a sheaf of Austrian spears, thus opening a path through which his comrades pressed to freedom?--when for years Napoleon did not lose a single battle in which he was personally engaged?--when Wellington fought in many climes without ever being conquered?--when Ney, on a hundred fields, changed apparent disaster into brilliant triumph?--when Perry left the disabled _Lawrence_, rowed to the _Niagara_, and silenced the British guns?--when Sheridan arrived from Winchester just as the Union retreat was becoming a rout, and turned the tide by riding along the line?--when Sherman, though sorely pressed, signaled his men to hold the fort, and they, knowing that their leader was coming, held it?

    History furnishes thousands of examples of men who have seized occasions to accomplish results deemed impossible by those less resolute.  Prompt decision and whole-souled action sweep the world before them.

    True, there has been but one Napoleon; but, on the other hand, the Alps that oppose the progress of the average American youth are not as high or dangerous as the summits crossed by the great Corsican.

    Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities.  _Seize common occasions and make them great_.

    On the morning of September 6, 1838, a young woman in the Longstone Lighthouse, between England and Scotland, was awakened by shrieks of agony rising above the roar of wind and wave.  A storm of unwonted fury was raging, and her parents could not hear the cries; but a telescope showed nine human beings clinging to the windlass of a wrecked vessel whose bow was hanging on the rocks half a mile away.  "We can do nothing," said William Darling, the light-keeper.  "Ah, yes, we must go to the rescue," exclaimed his daughter, pleading tearfully with both father and mother, until the former replied: "Very well, Grace, I will let you persuade me, though it is against my better judgment."  Like a feather in a whirlwind the little boat was tossed on the tumultuous sea, but, borne on the blast that swept the cruel surge, the shrieks of those shipwrecked sailors seemed to change her weak sinews into cords of steel.  Strength hitherto unsuspected came from somewhere, and the heroic girl pulled one oar in even time with her father.  At length the nine were safely on board.  "God bless you; but ye're a bonny English lass," said one poor fellow, as he looked wonderingly upon this marvelous girl, who that day had done a deed which added more to England's glory than the exploits of many of her monarchs.

    "If you will let me try, I think I can make something that will do," said a boy who had been employed as a scullion at the mansion of Signer Faliero, as the story is told by George Cary Eggleston.  A large company had been invited to a banquet, and just before the hour the confectioner, who had been making a large ornament for the table, sent word that he had spoiled the piece.  "You!" exclaimed the head servant, in astonishment; "and who are you?"  "I am Antonio Canova, the grandson of Pisano, the stone-cutter," replied the pale-faced little fellow.

    "And pray, what can you do?" asked the major-domo.  "I can make you something that will do for the middle of the table, if you'll let me try."  The servant was at his wits' end, so he told Antonio to go ahead and see what he could do.  Calling for some butter, the scullion quickly molded a large crouching lion, which the admiring major-domo placed upon the table.

    Dinner was announced, and many of the most noted merchants, princes, and noblemen of Venice were ushered into the dining-room.  Among them were skilled critics of art work.  When their eyes fell upon the butter lion, they forgot the purpose for which they had come in their wonder at such a work of genius.  They looked at the lion long and carefully, and asked Signer Faliero what great sculptor had been persuaded to waste his skill upon such a temporary material.  Faliero could not tell; so he asked the head servant, who brought Antonio before the company.

    When the distinguished guests learned that the lion had been made in a short time by a scullion, the dinner was turned into a feast in his honor.  The rich host declared that he would pay the boy's expenses under the best masters, and he kept his word.  Antonio was not spoiled by his good fortune, but remained at heart the same simple, earnest, faithful boy who had tried so hard to become a good stone-cutter in the shop of Pisano.  Some may not have heard how the boy Antonio took advantage of this first great opportunity; but all know of Canova, one of the greatest sculptors of all time.

    _Weak men wait for opportunities, strong men make them_.

    "The best men," says E. H. Chapin, "are not those who have waited for chances but who have taken them; besieged the chance; conquered the chance; and made chance the servitor."

    There may not be one chance in a million that you will ever receive unusual aid; but opportunities are often presented which you can improve to good advantage, if you will only _act_.

    The lack of opportunity is ever the excuse of a weak, vacillating mind. Opportunities!  Every life is full of them.  Every lesson in school or college is an opportunity.  Every examination is a chance in life. Every patient is an opportunity.  Every newspaper article is an opportunity.  Every client is an opportunity.  Every sermon is an opportunity.  Every business transaction is an opportunity,--an opportunity to be polite,--an opportunity to be manly,--an opportunity to be honest,--an opportunity to make friends.  Every proof of confidence in you is a great opportunity.  Every responsibility thrust upon your strength and your honor is priceless.  Existence is the privilege of effort, and when that privilege is met like a man, opportunities to succeed along the line of your aptitude will come faster than you can use them.  If a slave like Fred Douglass, who did not even own his body, can elevate himself into an orator, editor, statesman, what ought the poorest white boy to do, who is rich in opportunities compared with Douglass?

    It is the idle man, not the great worker, who is always complaining that he has no time or opportunity.  Some young men will make more out of the odds and ends of opportunities which many carelessly throw away than other will get out of a whole life-time.  Like bees, they extract honey from every flower.  Every person they meet, every circumstance of the day, adds something to their store of useful knowledge or personal power.

    "There is nobody whom Fortune does not visit once in his life," says a cardinal; "but when she finds he is not ready to receive her, she goes in at the door and out at the window."

    Cornelius Vanderbilt saw his opportunity in the steamboat, and determined to identify himself with steam navigation.  To the surprise of all his friends, he abandoned his prosperous business and took command of one of the first steamboats launched, at a salary of one thousand dollars a year.  Livingston and Fulton had acquired the sole right to navigate New York waters by steam, but Vanderbilt thought the law unconstitutional, and defied it until it was repealed.  He soon became a steamboat owner.  When the government was paying a large subsidy for carrying the European mails, he offered to carry them free and give better service.  His offer was accepted, and in this way he soon built up an enormous freight and passenger traffic.

    Foreseeing the great future of railroads in a country like ours, he plunged into railroad enterprises with all his might, laying the foundation for the vast Vanderbilt system of to-day.

    Young Philip Armour joined the long caravan of Forty-Niners, and crossed the "Great American Desert" with all his possessions in a prairie schooner drawn by mules.  Hard work and steady gains carefully saved in the mines enabled him to start, six years later, in the grain and warehouse business in Milwaukee.  In nine years he made five hundred thousand dollars.  But he saw his great opportunity in Grant's order, "On to Richmond."  One morning in 1864 he knocked at the door of Plankinton, partner in his venture as a pork packer.  "I am going to take the next train to New York," said he, "to sell pork 'short.' Grant and Sherman have the rebellion by the throat, and pork will go down to twelve dollars a barrel."  This was his opportunity.  He went to New York and offered pork in large quantities at forty dollars per barrel.  It was eagerly taken.  The shrewd Wall Street speculators laughed at the young Westerner, and told him pork would go to sixty dollars, for the war was not nearly over.  Mr. Armour, however, kept on selling, Grant continued to advance.  Richmond fell, pork fell with it to twelve dollars a barrel, and Mr. Armour cleared two millions of dollars.

    John D. Rockefeller saw his opportunity in petroleum.  He could see a large population in this country with very poor lights.  Petroleum was plentiful, but the refining process was so crude that the product was inferior, and not wholly safe.  Here was Rockefeller's chance.  Taking into partnership Samuel Andrews, the porter in a machine shop where both men had worked, he started a single barrel "still" in 1870, using an improved process discovered by his partner.  They made a superior grade of oil and prospered rapidly.  They admitted a third partner, Mr. Flagler, but Andrews soon became dissatisfied.  "What will you take for your interest?" asked Rockefeller.  Andrews wrote carelessly on a piece of paper, "One million dollars."  Within twenty-four hours Mr. Rockefeller handed him the amount, saying, "Cheaper at one million than ten."  In twenty years the business of the little refinery, scarcely worth one thousand dollars for building and apparatus, had grown into the Standard Oil Trust, capitalized at ninety millions of dollars, with stock quoted at 170, giving a market value of one hundred and fifty millions.

    These are illustrations of seizing opportunity for the purpose of making money.  But fortunately there is a new generation of electricians, of engineers, of scholars, of artists, of authors, and of poets, who find opportunities, thick as thistles, for doing something _nobler than merely amassing riches_.  Wealth is not an end to strive for, but an opportunity; not the climax of a man's career, but an incident.

    Mrs. Elizabeth Fry, a Quaker lady, saw her opportunity in the prisons of England.  From three hundred to four hundred half-naked women, as late as 1813, would often be huddled in a single ward of Newgate, London, awaiting trial.  They had neither beds nor bedding, but women, old and young, and little girls, slept in filth and rags on the floor. No one seemed to care for them, and the Government merely furnished food to keep them alive.  Mrs. Fry visited Newgate, calmed the howling mob, and told them she wished to establish a school for the young women and the girls, and asked them to select a schoolmistress from their own number.  They were amazed, but chose a young woman who had been committed for stealing a watch.  In three months these "wild beasts," as they were sometimes called, became harmless and kind.  The reform spread until the Government legalized the system, and good women throughout Great Britain became interested in the work of educating and clothing these outcasts.  Fourscore years have passed, and her plan has been adopted throughout the civilized world.

    A boy in England had been run over by a car, and the bright blood spurted from a severed artery.  No one seemed to know what to do until another boy, Astley Cooper, took his handkerchief and stopped the bleeding by pressure above the wound.  The praise which he received for thus saving the boy's life encouraging him to become a surgeon, the foremost of his day.

    "The time comes to the young surgeon," says Arnold, "when, after long waiting, and patient study and experiment, he is suddenly confronted with his first critical operation.  The great surgeon is away.  Time is pressing.  Life and death hang in the balance.  Is he equal to the emergency?  Can he fill the great surgeon's place, and do his work?  If he can, he is the one of all others who is wanted.  _His opportunity confronts him_.  He and it are face to face.  Shall he confess his ignorance and inability, or step into fame and fortune?  It is for him to say."

    Are you prepared for a great opportunity?

    "Hawthorne dined one day with Longfellow," said James T. Fields, "and brought a friend, with him from Salem.  After dinner the friend said, 'I have been trying to persuade Hawthorne to write a story based upon a legend of Acadia, and still current there,--the legend of a girl who, in the dispersion of the Acadians, was separated from her lover, and passed her life in waiting and seeking for him, and only found him dying in a hospital when both were old.'  Longfellow wondered that the legend did not strike the fancy of Hawthorne, and he said to him, 'If you have really made up your mind not to use it for a story, will you let me have it for a poem?'  To this Hawthorne consented, and promised, moreover, not to treat the subject in prose till Longfellow had seen what he could do with it in verse.  Longfellow seized his opportunity and gave to the world 'Evangeline, or the Exile of the Acadians.'"

    Open eyes will discover opportunities everywhere; open ears will never fail to detect the cries of those who are perishing for assistance; open hearts will never want for worthy objects upon which to bestow their gifts; open hands will never lack for noble work to do.

    Everybody had noticed the overflow when a solid is immersed in a vessel filled with water, although no one had made use of his knowledge that the body displaces its exact bulk of liquid; but when Archimedes observed the fact, he perceived therein an easy method of finding the cubical contents of objects, however irregular in shape.

    Everybody knew how steadily a suspended weight, when moved, sways back and forth until friction and the resistance of the air bring it to rest, yet no one considered this information of the slightest practical importance; but the boy Galileo, as he watched a lamp left swinging by accident in the cathedral at Pisa, saw in the regularity of those oscillations the useful principle of the pendulum.  Even the iron doors of a prison were not enough to shut him out from research.  He experimented with the straw of his cell, and learned valuable lessons about the relative strength of tubes and rods of equal diameters.

    For ages astronomers had been familiar with the rings of Saturn, and regarded them merely as curious exceptions to the supposed law of planetary

    No comments:

    Post a Comment